University of Canterbury Photographic Services
University of Canterbury Photographic Services
Photographic Services provides the University community with an in-house source of high quality images for print and web. They cover news and events, produce marketing and promotional material, provide image-based academic support, and work with the Library on archival and duplication tasks. This collection holds photos taken by the University of Canterbury's Photographic Services following the Canterbury earthquakes of 2010 and 2011. They show the impact of the earthquakes on the University, including: student involvement in the recovery process; the rebuild of campus; and earthquake-related research.
Contains 3 items
University of Canterbury Student Collection
University of Canterbury Student Collection
Research and collections contributed by University of Canterbury students.
Contains 6 items
Wellington Emergency Management Office
Wellington Emergency Management Office
The Wellington Emergency Management Office (WEMO) was formed in 2012. It is a semi-autonomous organisation that co-ordinates Civil Defence and Emergency Management services on behalf of the nine councils in the Wellington region. It is responsible for two key aspects of emergency management: community resilience, and operational readiness. In the aftermath of the 22 February 2011 earthquake, a number of volunteers from WEMO travelled to Christchurch in order to help with the emergency response. This collection holds photographs taken by the WEMO volunteers and Urban Search and Rescue team while they were in Christchurch.
Contains 2 items
Whole House Reuse Project
Whole House Reuse Project
Whole House Reuse is a project facilitated by Rekindle and supported by SIFT. It was created to make explicit the scale and breadth of materials of one modest home in order to deliver a broader understanding of the waste occurring as a result of demolition in Christchurch and throughout the country, and to provoke problem solving and innovation around future uses for materials currently being treated as waste. Over seven days in August and September 2013 a professional salvage crew from Silvan Salvage led by Graham Thompson fully deconstructed a single-storey red-zoned home at 19 Admirals Way situated in the Christchurch suburb of New Brighton. Along with a team of volunteers, the entire material of the home, aside from the concrete ring foundation, was dismantled by hand and transported into storage. From there, 480 materials listings have been recorded in the Catalogue of Resources that Whole House Reuse is now presenting to the creative community of New Zealand during its Design stage. This amazing record of the material of one home is contained within a book, 'Whole House Reuse: Deconstruction', that was released at the launch of the Design stage (30 January 2014). This publication also tells the story of the project so far, with photographic and written documentation of the salvage of 19 Admirals Way, a conversation with the homeowners, and a research paper on deconstruction in New Zealand. This collection holds the 'Whole House Reuse: Deconstruction' catalogue as well as the photographs of each individual item salvaged from the house. Photographs of the artwork and designs created by the Whole House Reuse material will also be added to the collection at a later stage.
Contains 2 items
Women's Voices: Recording women's experiences of the Canterbury earthquakes
Women's Voices: Recording women's experiences of the Canterbury earthquakes
Women’s Voices is an oral history project, created by the Christchurch Branch of the National Council of Women of New Zealand. Volunteers interviewed other women about their earthquake experiences and also provided brief profiles that include their own quake stories. The project has generated an archive of stories of women of different ages, backgrounds, and life experiences, who come from different areas in Christchurch and Canterbury. Some of these stories are available on UC QuakeStudies with the permission of the research participants.Interviews are still being completed and will be added to this archive as they become available. The mass media has often focused on heroic stories of rescue, the comments of decision makers, or the quake ‘victims’. This research generated women’s stories of day-to-day endurance after the quakes and the importance of families, friends, and neighbours at times of crisis. These stories document women’s contributions within workplaces, voluntary organisations and their communities in spite of ongoing emotional and financial stress, disrupted physical environments, trauma, and fear. Women talk about how their lives have changed and their hopes for Christchurch. Every woman has a unique story to tell.
Contains 3 items